Inhalts-Übersicht                                Bildershows
Sitemap                                               Slideshows

Das Bambus-Lexikon     
   Die Bambus-Enzyklopädie
     The Bamboo Lexicon
       Le Lexique de Bambou

Bamboo Biomass

An INBAR Working Paper by I.R. Hunter an Wu Jungi

Abstract

A key issue in the profitability of bamboo plantations is the productivity that can be expected. This working paper summarises the accessible published information. The evidence is scant and contradictory. Consequently it is difficult to reach conclusive findings. However the working paper finds that the biomass of bamboo differs from that of tree crops by degree only. Productivity of bamboo is generally within the range of woody biomass in the same environment with the exception that bamboo culm biomass never seems to reach the very high values attainable by tree stem biomass in favourable situations.

Introduction

A key issue in the profitability of plantations is the productivity of those plantations. There is relatively little published about the productivity of bamboo plantations. This working paper attempts to draw together what is known.

Methodology for Quantifying Bamboo Biomass

Quantifying the biomass of bamboo should pose relatively few new problems to workers experienced in quantifying tree biomass. Bamboo stands can be divided and sampled into the familiar components of :-
1. Leaves
2. Branches
3. Stems or culms. Note however that there may be a complicating factor in the
quantification of culms in that the stems are usually hollow. However orthodox ratiobased tree biomass quantification techniques are able to handle this. A further more serious potential complicating factor is that the wet weight: dry weight ratio may vary with the age of the culm – younger culms being wetter. This has implications for those ratio methods generally used to calculate biomass – it being most unusual to weigh and dry the entire biomass. The currently available literature does not seem to address this point.
4. Coarse roots or rhizomes
5. Fine roots.
Bamboo may not grow in pure stands so a complicating factor may be the necessity to include other types of vegetation in the quantification of total biomass or to arrive at a satisfactory method of estimating the proportion of the area covered by bamboo. This seems likely to be more problematic with sympodial bamboo which grows in clumps than with monopodial bamboo (which grows in stands).

Methodology Used

The methodology for quantifying bamboo biomass that has been used by the various
authors reviewed in this paper is indeed more or less the same as used for tree biomass.
See for example Verwijst et al. (1999) for tree biomass methodology and Veblen et al.
(1980) for its adaptation to bamboo biomass.
1. Most authors worked from a bounded plot, laid out of a sufficiently large size to
encompass variation. They measured all the culms inside the bounded plot for
diameter and a proportion measured for length. Few of the authors separated culms
into different ages although it might be advisable for future workers to test whether
classification of the culms into at least three classes (immature, mature and dry)
improves accuracy. A subsample of culms was taken, diameter, wet weight and
length recorded. From that subsample, leaves, branches and culm were stripped and
wet weight recorded. Coarse roots were sometimes dug up and weighed after
cleaning. A separate procedure was required to estimate fine roots – either repeat
sampling of root cores or root ingrowth cores.
2. A subsample of the leaves, branches and culms (and/or roots) was taken and the wetweight of each component accurately recorded. The subsamples were dried in a cooloven and the dry weight of each component accurately recorded.
3. The biomass was then calculated by working back through the ratios.

Results of studies

1. Total biomass (above ground) and study site environment

Species Country Latitude degrees Altitude masl Temperature °C Rainfall mm Total biomass t/ha Note Reference

Chusquea culeou Chile 40 700 8? 4000 156-162 Veblen et al. (1980)
Chusquea tenuiflora Chile 40 1000 6.5 5633 13 Understorey Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus India 25 ---- 26 830 4 – 22 Tripathi and Singh (1994)
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata Indonesia 7 1100 28? 2000 45 Christanty et al. (1996)
Bambusa bambos India 12 540 31 600 122 (at 4) 225 (at 6)  87 (at 8) Shamnughavel and Francis (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus India 24 280-519 1069 30 (at 3) 36 (at 4) Singh and Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens Japan 34 65 15.3 1581 138 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendroca lamus latiflorus Munro.China 26 O 20.8 1700 28.49 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami China 24O38’- 25O11’ 20.6 1448-2023 134.49 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana China 32 O 0.353 Panda bamboo Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

One should make several comments about the figures given in Table 1. The Chusquea tenuiflora biomass was estimated from bamboo growing under a Nothofagus stand with only 35% full light. The results would have been markedly depressed by competition from the trees. The Bashania described by Zhou (1997) is a low growing “panda bamboo” that grows at very high altitude and typically has a very low biomass.
On the other hand the figures given by Shamnughavel and Francis (1996) are somewhat surprisingly high given the other data recorded about their sample stand (see comments below Table 3).
The various authors quote other studies (not seen by this author) for comparative
purposes. Thus Isagi et al. (1997) quote biomass of 114.8 t/ha for Sasa kurilensis; 143 t/ha for Bambusa blumeana; 146.8 t/ha for Gigantochloa levis and 136.8 t/ha for Phyllostachys bambusoides. Singh and Singh (1999) add 100 t/ha for Arundinaria alpina in Kenya. Christianty et al. discuss a 43.2 t/ha biomass in Phyllostachys pubescens in Taiwan.
Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) give a table containing biomass data for 26 bamboo species culled from many authors (including some of those in table 1). Their highest total biomass was that reported by Shamnughavel and Francis (1996). Their next highest biomass was a cluster of observations at approximately 180 t/ha. Their lowest biomass was 7 tonnes/ha (above ground), also from “panda” bamboos. Their overall average was 145 tonnes/ha over a range from 23 to 298 t/ha. However if the surprisingly high value of Shamnughavel and Francis (1996) is excluded the average becomes 130 t/ha.

2. Annual productivity

Species: Annual productivity (t/Species (t/ha/year): Reference
Chusquea culeou 10 – 11.4 Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus 1.8 – 7.0 * Tripathi and Singh (1993) * culms only
Dendrocalamus strictus 1.8 – 7.7 # Tripathi and Singh (1994) # excludes other vegetation
Phyllostachys pubescens 18.1 Isagi et al. 1997

3. Culm weight

Species: Culm weight (t/ha): Reference
Chusquea culeou 127-130 Veblen et al. (1980)
Chusquea tenuiflora 9.4 Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus 7.8 - 30 Tripathi and Singh 1993
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata 34.4 Christanty et al. (1996)
Bambusa bambos 93 (at age 4) 187 (at age 6) 243 (at age 8) Shamnughavel and Francis (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 24 (at age 3) 38 (at age 5) Singh and Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 116.5 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendroca lamus latiforus Munro. 16.67 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 95.51 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (young) 0.155 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

The high dry weights given by Shamnughavel and Francis (1996) are surprising, since the average diameter stated at age 8 (8.3 cm) and the average height (28.5 m) would with the stated number of stems (4250) give a volume for perfect (solid) cylinders of only 218 m3/hectare.

Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) tabulate culm weights of between 8 and 243 t/ha: the highest value being that of Shamnughavel and Francis (1996). Their next highest values are 112 and 117 t/ha.

4. Leaf weight

Species: Leaf weight (t/ha): Reference
Chusquea culeou 25.0 * Veblen et al. *Note: weight of “leaves and sheaths”
Chusquea tenuiflora 3.5 * Veblen et al. (1980)
Gigantochloa ater; G.verticilata 4.7 Christanty et al. (1996)
Bambusa bambos 1.9 (at age 4) 3.5 (at age 6)4.0 (at age 8) Shamnughavel and Francis (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 6.1 (at age 3) 7.9 (at age 4 10.7 (at age 5) Singh and Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 5.9 Isagi et al. (1997) Dendrocalamus latiflorus Munro.
3.37 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 14.81 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (young) 0.122 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

The two Chusquea stands in Chile have very high leaf weights because the component was estimated from “leaves and sheaths”. These results are therefore not strictly comparable with others. The figure of 4.27 tonnes/ha/year given for litterfall in the more productive stand (see table 8) is probably a better estimate of leaf mass.
Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) tabulate leaf weights of between 1 and 37 t/ha. The
highest value aside, the next highest leaf weight was 11 tonnes/ha.
A slightly unusual feature of bamboo species generally by comparison with woody
biomass, highlighted by Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) is the high uptake of potassium in their leaves. Bamboo species seem generally to have a 1:1 ratio of nitrogen to potassium. This may have implications for site preference.

5. Branch weight

Species: Branch weight (t/ha): Reference
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata 6.0 Christanty et al. (1996)
Phyllostachys pubescens 15.5 Isagi et al. 1997
Dendroca lamus latiforus Munro. 8.45 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 28.17 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (young) 0.076 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) tabulate branch weights of 6 to 40 t/ha.

6. Coarse roots and rhizomes

Species: Coarse root weight (t/ha): Reference
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata 10.5 + 2.1 Christanty et al. (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 11.9 (at age 3) 14.0 (at age 4) 18.8 (at age 5) Singh and Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 16.7 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendroca lamus latiforus Munro. 3.31 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 12.00 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (young) 0.064 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

7. Fine roots

Species Fine root weight (t/ha) Reference
Dendrocalamus strictus 7.0 – 8.7 Tripathi and Singh (1993)
Gigantochloa ater; G.verticilata 18.9 Christanty et al. (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 3.6 (at age 3) 5.3 (at age 5) Singh and Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 27.9 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendrocalamus latiforus Munro. 1.10 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 9.60 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (young) 0.079 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

8. Litterfall
Species: Litterfall per year (t/ha/yr): Reference
Chusquea culeou 4.27 Veblen et al. (1980)
Chusquea tenuiflora 0.09 Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus 4.1 – 1.2 Tripathi and Singh (1994)
Bambusa bambos 9.2 –11.8 Shamnughavel and Francis (1996)
Phyllostachys pubescens 4.4 (6.8 including twigs and sheaths) Isagi et al. (1997)

The litterfall in an established stand of bamboo (in what is an overlapping deciduous plant, where new leaf creation is matched by old leaf senescence) should be roughly equal to the new leaf production. That relationship is broken in the paper of Shamnughavel and Francis (1996). Their leaf weight data is in line with that of other authors but their annual litterfall is not sustainable since it greatly exceeds the total leaf weight.

Singh and Singh (1999) give estimates for litter decomposition of 28 months for 95% mass loss and 8 months for 50% mass loss. Christanty et al. (1996) on the other hand thought that bamboo litter decomposed relatively slowly due to its high silica content. They noted that their forest floor at 36 months consisted mainly of bamboo leaves, indicating their relatively slow decomposition.

Discussion
Given the very high degree of variability in the data, it is very difficult to generalise.
For example one would expect a broad relationship between productivity, temperature and rainfall. Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) quote from several other authors stating that “precipitation affects distribution and limits growth of bamboo more than any other component of climate, except temperature.” However such a relationship is difficult to discern in these data.
It does appear that one can generalise, however, that the amount and distribution of bamboo biomass differs from that for tree biomass by degree only. For example Winjum et al. (1997) estimate that mean carbon storage in above- and below-ground biomass of forest plantations is 47 t C/ha in high latitudes, 76 t C/ha in middle latitudes, 62 t C/ha in low-dry latitudes and 80 t C/ha in low- moist latitudes. Since carbon is approximately 40% of biomass these figures are equivalent to between 100 and 160 t/ha of biomass.

Santa-Regina and Tarazona (2001) report total biomass ranged from 132.7 t/ha in a beech stand to 152.1 t/ha in the pine stand in Northern Spain. Thus the biomass figures given in table 1 of this paper and in Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) are fairly much within the expected range for woody biomass.

The key differences are the smaller piece size and higher number of “stems” typical of a bamboo plantation and that bamboo biomass never seems to approach the very high figures possible in some tree stands. For example Alabeck and Juday (1989) report volume estimates for Sitka Spruce in Southern Alaska that would be consistent with dry biomass of over 700 t/ha. Silvester and Orchard (1999) report up to 1700 t/ha of above ground biomass in Kauri (Agathis) in New Zealand. Ponette et al. (2001) found that total aboveground biomass of Douglas Fir in France increased with increasing stand age, from about 160 t ha-1 in the youngest stands to 360 t ha-1 in the 54-year old plot. Simpson et al. (2000) reported that for Queensland total biomass at clearfall of a typical slash pine stand was 316 t/ ha. Laurance et al. (1999) studying biomass in the tropical rainforest around Manuas Brazil found that biomass estimates varied more than 2-fold, from 231 to 492 t/ ha, with a mean of 356 t/ ha.

This difference between bamboo and tree crops means that while on average bamboo may sequester as much carbon as tree crops on sites favourable to trees, plantations of trees will sequester much more.

Annual productivity figures (table 2) indicate that bamboo can produce at between 10 and 20 t/ha/year. Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) tabulate the age class distribution of bamboo stems. They show that for most species culms are distributed between four years of growth. Their average total biomass figure of 130-142 t/ha can therefore be roughly reworked to show a maximum annual productivity of between 32 and 36 t/ha – lower if the culms last for longer. However growth rates of between 10 and 30 t/ha are not exceptional amongst woody biomass species. Heilman and Xie (1993) report mean annual woody biomass production (aboveground), of between 21 and 25 t/ha/yr in poplar in Canada and in a later paper reported increments of 35 t/ha/yr. Stanley and Montagnini (1999) report that in young plantations of 4 indigenous tree species in Costa Rica total annual tree biomass production rates ranged from about 5.2 t/ha to 10.3 t/ha. Anil-Kumar et al. (1998) report 17 t/ha/yr for Acacia auriculiformis. Srivastava (1995) estimated 29 t/ha/year for Casuarina equisitifolia in Uttar Pradesh, India, showing that the performance of Casuarina is good under dry tropical conditions. Kadeba (1991) reported that mean annual biomass production of Pinus caribaea in N. Nigeria was 10.75 t/ha over the 15-year period.

The data for bamboo leaf biomass is variable (table 4). Most stands appear to have leaf weights of ~ 5 tonnes per hectare although there are two observations at 10.7 and 14.8 tonnes/ha. Kleinhenz and Midmore (2001) likewise report leaf weights of between 1 and 11 t/ha with one outlier of 37 t/ha. Five of their 8 observations are 6 t/ha or less. If it were generally true that bamboo has leaf weights of approximately 5 tonnes/hectare yet high productivity that might indicate a possible quantitative difference with tree crops. Tree crops sometimes have higher leaf biomass. For example Chen et al. (1998) report that the biomass of a 9-yr-old Casuarina equisitifolia stand in Taiwan was 119.3 t/ha (7.4, 27.6, 63.5, and 20.8 t/ha for leaves, branches, stems, and roots, respectively). Madgwick (1985) reported that needle mass can reach 15 t/ha in Radiata pine stands 4-8 year old, but drops to about 10 t/ha in older stands. Thus bamboo may produce more dry matter per unit of leaf mass than some tree crops, but the data are inadequate to determine this.
Bamboo invests a sizeable proportion of its energy below-ground. However the amount may not be significantly greater than for many tree crops. Oleksyn et al. (1999) found that total root biomass accounted for between 19 and 28% of total stand biomass in 12-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) from 19 populations grown in a provenance experiment in central Poland (52°N.). Naidu et al. (1998) found that dominant trees of loblolly pine allocated 63.4, 13.2, 11.3, and 12.0% of biomass to bole, branch, needle and root tissue, compared with 75.9, 6.7, 5.6, and 11.7% for suppressed trees. Gaston et al. (1998) report that in grass/shrub savannas of Africa the aboveground forest biomass accounted for 75% of the total, below-ground forest biomass for 21%, and grass/shrub savannas for 4%. Heilman et al. (1994) working with four-year old poplar found that total weight of stumps and coarse roots at harvest varied from 12.3 to 29.6 t/ha, or 22-33% of the weight of above-ground leafless biomass. Thus the above-ground: belowground distribution of biomass in bamboo may not be unusual.

Conclusion

The variability of the currently published data makes it difficult to generalise. More,simple biomass determinations are needed. Ultimately the bamboo-growing industryneeds a simple productivity relationship linking bamboo biomass growth toenvironmental variables but to calculate such, much more data are needed.

References

Alaback PB; Juday GP: 1989: Structure and composition of low elevation old-growthforests in research natural areas of Southeast Alaska. Natural Areas Journal. 1989, 9: 1,27-39

Anil-Kumar; Siddiqui MH; Pandey ON: 1998: Biomass production of Acacia
auriculiformis (A. Cunn. ex. Benth.). Journal of Research, Birsa Agricultural University.1998, 10: 1, 103-106;

Chen TsaiHuei; Sheu BorHung; Chang ChunTe: 1998: Accumulation of stand biomassand nutrient content of casuarina plantations in the Suhu coastal area. Taiwan Journal of Forest Science. 1998, 13: 4, 335-349

Christanty L; Mailly D; Kimmins JP: 1996; Without bamboo, the land dies': biomass,litterfall, and soil organic matter dynamics of a Javanese bamboo talun-kebun system.Forest Ecology and Management. 1996, 87: 1-3, 75-88

Gaston G; Brown S; Lorenzini M; Singh KD: 1998: State and change in carbon pools inthe forests of tropical Africa. Global Change Biology. 1998, 4: 1, 97-114
Heilman PE; Xie FG; 1993: Influence of nitrogen on growth and productivity of shortrotation Populus trichocarpa X Populus deltoides hybrids. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 1993, 23: 9, 1863-1869

Heilman PE; Ekuan G; Fogle D; 1994: Above- and below-ground biomass and fine roots of 4-year-old hybrids of Populus trichocarpa X Populus deltoides and parental species in short-rotation culture. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 1994, 24: 6, 1186-1192Isagi Y; Kawahara T; Kamo K; Ito H: 1997: Net production and carbon cycling in a bamboo Phyllostachys pubescens stand. Plant Ecology. 1997, 130: 1, 41-52

Kadeba O: 1991: Above-ground biomass production and nutrient accumulation in an age sequence of Pinus caribaea stands. Forest Ecology and Management. 1991, 41: 3-4, 237- 248.

Kleinhenz V and Midmore DJ: 2001: Aspects of bamboo agronomy. Advances in
Agronomy 74: 99-149.

Laurance WF; Fearnside PM; Laurance SG; Delamonica P; Lovejoy TE; Rankin de
Merona JM; Chambers JQ; Gascon C 1999: Relationship between soils and Amazon
forest biomass: a landscape scale study. Forest Ecology and Management. 1999, 118: 1-3, 127-138

Lin Yiming; Lin Peng; Wen Wanzhang: Studies on dynamics of carbon and nitrogen
elements in Dendrocalamopsis oldhami forest. Jounal of Bamboo Research. 1998, 17:4, 25-30. In Chinese language.
Lin Yiming; Li Huicong; Linpeng; Xiao Xiantan; Ma Zhanxing: Biomass Structure and Energy Distribution of Dend roca lamus latiforus Munro. population. Jounal of Bamboo Research. 2000, 19:4, 36-41. In Chinese language.

Madgwick HAI: 1985: Dry matter and nutrient relationships in stands of Pinus radiata. New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science. 1985, 15: 3, 324-336

Naidu SL; DeLucia EH; Thomas RB 1998:Contrasting patterns of biomass allocation in dominant and suppressed loblolly pine. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 1998, 28: 8, 1116-1124

Oleksyn J; Reich PB; Chalupka W; Tjoelker MG 1999: Differential above- and belowground  biomass accumulation of European Pinus sylvestris populations in a 12-year-old provenance experiment. Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research. 1999, 14: 1, 7-17

Ponette Q; Ranger J; Ottorini JM; Ulrich E. 2001: Aboveground biomass and nutrient content of five Douglas fir stands in France. Forest Ecology and Management. 2001, 142: 1 3, 109 127

Santa Regina I; Tarazona T: 2001: Nutrient cycling in a natural beech forest and adjacent planted pine in northern Spain. Forestry Oxford. 2001, 74: 1, 11-28

Shanmughavel P; Francis K 1996: Biomass and nutrient cycling in bamboo (Bambusa bambos) plantations of tropical areas. Biology and Fertility of Soils. 1996, 23: 4, 431-434

Silvester-WB; Orchard-TA 1999: The biology of kauri (Agathis australis) in New
Zealand. I. Production, biomass, carbon storage, and litter fall in four forest remnants. New-Zealand-Journal-of-Botany. 1999, 37: 3, 553-571

Simpson JA; Xu ZH; Smith T; Keay P; Osborne DO; Podberscek M; Nambiar EKS (ed.); Tiarks A (ed.); Cossalter C (ed.); Ranger J: 2000: Effects of site management in pine plantations on the coastal lowlands of subtropical Queensland, Australia. Site management and productivity in tropical plantation forests: a progress report. Workshop Proceedings, Kerala, India, 7-11 December 1999. 2000, 73-81

Singh AN; Singh JS: 1999: Biomass, net primary production and impact of bamboo
plantation on soil redevelopment in a dry tropical region. Forest Ecology and
Management. 1999, 119: 1-3, 195-207

Srivastava AK; 1995: Biomass and energy production in Casuarina equisetifolia
plantation stands in the degraded dry tropics of the Vindhyan Plateau India. Biomass and Bioenergy. 1995, 9: 6, 465-471

Stanley WG; Montagnini F: 1999: Biomass and nutrient accumulation in pure and mixed plantations of indigenous tree species grown on poor soils in the humid tropics of Costa Rica. : Forest Ecology and Management. 1999, 113: 1, 91-103
Tripathi, S.K. and Singh, K.P., 1993: An ecological assessment of spatial pattern in site conditions in bamboo plantations in a dry tropical region with a comment on clump spacing. Indian Forester. 1993, 119: 3, 238-246

Tripathi, S.K. and Singh, K.P., 1994:Productivity and nutrient cycling in recently
harvested and mature bamboo savannas in the dry tropics. Journal of Applied Ecology. 1994, 31: 1, 109-124

Veblen, T.T., Schlegel, F.M. and Escobar, B.R., 1980: Dry matter production of two
species of bamboo (Chusquea culeou and C. tenuiflora) in South-Central Chile. Journal of Ecology 68: 397-404

Verwijst T; Telenius B; Makeschin F: 1999: Biomass estimation procedures in short
rotation forestry. Special issue: Short rotation forestry in central and northern Europe. Forest Ecology and Management. 1999, 121: 1-2, 137-146

Winjum JK; Dixon RC; Schroeder PE 1997: Carbon storage in forest plantations and their wood products. Journal of World Forest Resource Management. 1997, 8: 1, 1-19

Zhou Shiqiang; Huang Jinyan; A study on the clonal population biomass of young
Bashania fangiana after natural regeneration. Jounal of Bamboo Research. 1997, 16: 2, 35-39. In Chinese language.

Bambus Biomasse (Grobe Übersetzung)

 

Abstract
Eine zentrale Frage der Rentabilität des Bambus-Plantagen ist die Produktivität, die kann
erwartet. Dieses Arbeitspapier fasst die zugänglichen veröffentlichten Informationen. Die Beweis ist spärlich und widersprüchlich. Folglich ist es schwierig zu erreichen schlüssigen Erkenntnisse. Doch das Arbeitspapier fest, dass die Biomasse von Bambus aus, dass unterscheidet von Baumkronen durch Grad nur. Produktivität aus Bambus ist in der Regel im Bereich von holziger Biomasse in der gleichen Umgebung mit der Ausnahme, dass Bambusrohr Biomasse scheint nie zu erreichen die sehr hohe Werte erreichbar durch Baumstamm Biomasse in günstigen Situationen.
Einführung
Ein zentrales Thema in der Rentabilität der Plantagen ist die Produktivität dieser Plantagen. Es ist relativ wenig über die Produktivität der Plantagen veröffentlicht. Dies Arbeitspapier versucht zu ziehen zusammen, was bekannt ist.
Methodik zur Quantifizierung von Bamboo Biomasse. Die Quantifizierung der Biomasse von Bambus sollte relativ wenige neue Probleme für die Arbeitnehmer darstellen erlebt bei der Quantifizierung Baum-Biomasse. Bamboo Stände können geteilt und in abgetastet werden die bekannten Komponenten: -
1. Blätter
2. Zweige
3. Stängel oder Halme. Beachten Sie jedoch, dass es möglicherweise ein erschwerender Faktor in der sein Quantifizierung von Halmen, daß die Stiele sind gewöhnlich hohl. Allerdings orthodoxen ratiobased Baum-Biomasse Quantifizierung Techniken sind in der Lage, damit umzugehen. Ein
weiterer mehr
ernst zu nehmende potenzielle Erschwerend kommt hinzu, dass das nasse Gewicht: Trockengewicht Verhältnis kann variieren mit dem Alter der Halm - jüngere Halme ist wetter. Dies hat Auswirkungen auf jene Verhältnis Verfahren in der Regel verwendet, um Biomasse zu berechnen - wobei die meisten ungewöhnlich, wiegen und trocknen die gesamte Biomasse. Die derzeit verfügbaren Literatur scheint nicht zu auf diesen Punkt eingehen.
4. Wurzeln oder Rhizome
5. Feinwurzeln.

Bamboo darf nicht in reinen Beständen wachsen so ein erschwerender Faktor die Notwendigkeit sein kann, um andere Arten von Vegetation in der Quantifizierung der gesamten Biomasse oder an eine Ankunft zufriedenstellendes Verfahren zum Schätzen der Anteil der Fläche von Bambus bedeckt. Dies wahrscheinlich zu sein problematisch sympodial Bambus, in Büscheln wächst als mit monopodial Bambus (was wächst in Stände).
Methodik
Die Methodik zur Quantifizierung Bambus Biomasse, die von den verschiedenen verwendet wurde Autoren dieses Papiers bewertet ist in der Tat mehr oder weniger das gleiche wie für Baum-Biomasse eingesetzt.
Siehe zum Beispiel Verwijst et al. (1999) für Baum-Biomasse Methodik und Veblen et al. (1980) für seine Anpassung an Bambus Biomasse.
Ein. Die meisten Autoren von einer begrenzten Grundstück arbeitete, legte eine ausreichend große Größe umfassen Variation. Sie maßen alle Halme im begrenzten Grundstück für Durchmesser und ein Teil für die Länge gemessen. Einige der Autoren getrennt Halme in verschiedenen Altersstufen, obwohl es könnte sinnvoll sein, für zukünftige Arbeitnehmer zu testen, ob Klassifizierung der Halme in mindestens drei Klassen (unreife, reife und trockene) verbessert die Genauigkeit. Eine Teilprobe von Halmen genommen wurde,
Durchmesser, Nassgewicht und Länge aufgezeichnet. Von diesem Teilstichprobe wurden Blätter, Zweige und culm beraubt und Nassgewicht aufgezeichnet. Grobwurzeln wurden manchmal ausgegraben und nach der Säuberung gewogen. Ein gesondertes Verfahren erforderlich war, um feinen Wurzeln zu schätzen - entweder wiederholen
Probenahme vom Kernballen oder root Einwachsen Kerne.
2. Eine Teilprobe der Blätter, Zweige und Halme (und / oder Wurzeln) übernommen wurde und die nasse Gewicht jeder Komponente genau aufgezeichnet. Die Teilproben wurden in einem kühlen getrocknet Backofen und dem Trockengewicht aller Komponenten genau aufgezeichnet.
3. Die Biomasse wurde dann durch die Arbeit zurück durch die Verhältnisse berechnet.
Ergebnisse von Studien
1. Biomasse insgesamt (oberirdisch) und Prüfzentrum Umfeld

Holzart Land Breitengrad Grad Höhe m.ü.M. Temperatur ° C Niederschlag mm Biomasse insgesamt t / ha Hinweis Reference
Chusquea culeou Chile 40 700 8? 4000 156-162 Veblen et al. (1980)
Chusquea tenuiflora Chile 40 1000 6,5 5633 13 Unterwuchs Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus India 25 ---- 26 830 4 bis 22 Tripathi und Singh (1994)
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata Indonesia 7 1100 28? 2000 45 Christanty et al. (1996)
Bambusa bambos Indien 12 540 31 600 122 (bei 4) 225 (bei 6) 87 (bei 8) Shamnughavel und Francis (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus Indien 24 280-519 1069 30 (bei 3) 36 (bei 4) Singh und Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens Japan 34 65 15,3 1581 138 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendroca Lamus latiflorus Munro.China 26 O 20,8 1700 28,49 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami China 24O38'-25O11 '20,6 1448-2023 134,49 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana China 32 O 0,353 Panda Bambus Zhou Shiqiang (1997)


Man sollte einige Bemerkungen zu den Zahlen in Tabelle 1 angegeben. Die Chusquea tenuiflora Biomasse wurde aus Bambus geschätzt Anbau unter einem Nothofagus Stand mit nur 35% der vollen Licht. Die Ergebnisse wären deutlich durch die Konkurrenz aus den Bäumen gedrückt haben. Die Bashania von Zhou (1997) beschrieben ist eine niedrig wachsende "panda Bambus", das mit sehr großer Höhe wächst und hat
typischerweise eine sehr geringe Biomasse.
Auf der anderen Seite die Zahlen Shamnughavel und Francis (1996) sind etwas überraschend hohe angesichts der anderen Daten über ihre Probenstand aufgezeichnet (siehe Kommentar nachstehenden Tabelle 3).
Die verschiedenen Autoren zitieren anderen Studien (nicht dieses Autors zu sehen) für die vergleichende Zwecke. Somit Isagi et al. (1997) Zitat Biomasse 114,8 t / ha für Sasa kurilensis; 143 t / ha für Bambusa blumeana; 146,8 t / ha für Gigantochloa levis und 136,8 t / ha für Phyllostachys bambusoides. Singh und Singh (1999) mit 100 t / ha für Arundinaria alpina in Kenia. Christianty et al. diskutieren 43,2 t / ha Biomasse in Phyllostachys pubescens in Taiwan.
Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) geben eine Tabelle mit Biomasse für 26 Bambus
Arten gekeult von vielen Autoren (darunter einige von denen in Tabelle 1). Ihre höchste Summe Biomasse wurde, dass durch Shamnughavel und Francis (1996) berichtet. Ihre nächste höchsten Biomasse war ein Cluster von Beobachtungen bei etwa 180 t / ha. Den niedrigsten Biomasse betrug 7 t / ha (oberirdisch), ebenfalls aus "panda" Bambus. Ihr Gesamtanteil lag bei 145 Tonnen / ha über einen Bereich von 23 bis 298 t / ha. Allerdings, wenn die überraschend hohe Wert Shamnughavel und Francis (1996) ist ausgeschlossen die durchschnittliche wird 130 t / ha.
2. Jährliche Produktivitätssteigerung

Species: Annual Produktivität (t / Species Annual Produktivität (t / ha / Jahr) Referenz
Chusquea culeou 10 bis 11,4 Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus 1,8 bis 7,0 * Tripathi und Singh (1993) * Halme nur
Dendrocalamus strictus 1,8 bis 7,7 # Tripathi und Singh (1994) # schließt andere Vegetation
Phyllostachys pubescens 18,1 Isagi et al. 1997

3. Culm Gewicht
Species Culm Gewicht (t / ha) Referenz
Chusquea culeou 127-130 Veblen et al. (1980)
Chusquea tenuiflora 9,4 Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus 7,8 bis 30 Tripathi und Singh 1993
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata 34,4 Christanty et al. (1996)
Bambusa bambos 93 (im Alter von 4) 187 (im Alter von 6) 243 (im Alter von 8) Shamnughavel und Francis (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 24 (im Alter von 3) 38 (im Alter von 5) Singh und Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 116,5 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendroca Lamus latiforus Munro. 16,67 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 95,51 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (junge) 0,155 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

Die hohen Trockengewicht von Shamnughavel und Francis (1996) gegeben sind überraschend, da der mittlere Durchmesser im Alter von acht (8,3 cm) angegeben und die durchschnittliche Höhe (28,5 m) würde mit der angegebenen Anzahl von Stämmen (4250) geben ein Volumen für perfekte (fest) Zylinder nur 218 m3/hectare.
Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) tabellarisch culm Gewichten von zwischen 8 und 243 t / ha: die höchste Wert ist, dass der Shamnughavel und Francis (1996). Ihre nächste höchsten Werte sind 112 und 117 t / ha.
4. Flügelgewicht
Species Flügelgewicht (t / ha) Referenz
Chusquea culeou 25,0 * Veblen et al. * Hinweis: Gewicht der "Blätter und Scheiden"
Chusquea tenuiflora 3,5 * Veblen et al. (1980)
Gigantochloa ater; G.verticilata 4,7 Christanty et al. (1996)
Bambusa bambos 1,9 (im Alter von 4) 3,5 (im Alter von 6) 4.0 (im Alter von 8) Shamnughavel und Francis (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 6,1 (im Alter von 3) 7.9 (im Alter von 4 10,7 (im Alter von 5) Singh und Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 5,9 Isagi et al. (1997) Dendrocalamus latiflorus Munro.
3,37 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 14,81 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (junge) 0,122 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

Die beiden Chusquea Ständen in Chile haben eine sehr hohe Flügelgewichte da die Komponente wurde von "Blätter und Scheiden" geschätzt. Diese Ergebnisse sind daher nicht streng mit anderen vergleichbar. Die Zahl von 4,27 Tonnen / ha / Jahr für Streu in der mehr gegeben produktive Stand (siehe Tabelle 8) ist wahrscheinlich eine bessere Schätzung der Blattmasse.
Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) tabellarisch Flügelgewichte zwischen 1 und 37 t / ha. Die höchsten Wert abgesehen, war die nächst höhere Flügelgewicht 11 Tonnen / ha.
Eine etwas ungewöhnliche Eigenschaft Bambusarten der Regel durch einen Vergleich mit holzigen Biomasse, von Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) hervorgehoben wird, ist die hohe Aufnahme von Kalium in ihren Blättern. Bambus Arten scheinen allgemein ein 1:1 Verhältnis von Stickstoff zu Kalium. Dies kann Auswirkungen auf die Website Präferenz.
5. Zweiggewicht
Species Niederlassung Gewicht (t / ha) Referenz
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata 6,0 Christanty et al. (1996)
Phyllostachys pubescens 15,5 Isagi et al. 1997
Dendroca Lamus latiforus Munro. 8,45 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 28,17 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (junge) 0,076 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) tabellarisch Zweiggewichte von 6 bis 40 t / ha.

6. Grob Wurzeln und Rhizome
Species Coarse root Gewicht (t / ha) Referenz
Gigantochloa ater; G. verticilata 10,5 + 2,1 Christanty et al. (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 11,9 (im Alter von 3) 14,0 (im Alter von 4) 18,8 (im Alter von 5) Singh und Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 16,7 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendroca Lamus latiforus Munro. 3,31 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 12,00 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (junge) 0,064 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)

7. Feinwurzeln
Species Feine root Gewicht (t / ha) Referenz
Dendrocalamus strictus 7,0 bis 8,7 Tripathi und Singh (1993)
Gigantochloa ater; G.verticilata 18,9 Christanty et al. (1996)
Dendrocalamus strictus 3,6 (im Alter von 3) 5.3 (im Alter von 5) Singh und Singh (1999)
Phyllostachys pubescens 27,9 Isagi et al. (1997)
Dendrocalamus latiforus Munro. 1,10 Lin Yiming (2000)
Dendrocalamopsis oldhami 9,60 Lin Yiming (1998)
Bashania fangiana (junge) 0,079 Zhou Shiqiang (1997)
8. Streufall Species Streufall pro Jahr (t / ha / yr) Referenz
Chusquea culeou 4,27 Veblen et al. (1980)
Chusquea tenuiflora 0,09 Veblen et al. (1980)
Dendrocalamus strictus 4,1 bis 1,2 Tripathi und Singh (1994)
Bambusa bambos 9,2 -11,8 Shamnughavel und Francis (1996)
Phyllostachys pubescens 4,4 (6,8 darunter Zweige und Hüllen) Isagi et al. (1997)
Die Streu in einem etablierten Stand von Bambus (in dem, was ist eine überlappender Laubmasse, in dem neuen Blatt Erstellung von alten Blattseneszenz abgestimmt ist) sollte etwa sein gleich dem neuen Blatt Produktion. Diese Beziehung wird in dem Papier gebrochen Shamnughavel und Francis (1996). Ihre Flügelgewicht Daten steht im Einklang mit der von anderen
Autoren, sondern ihre jährlichen Streu ist nicht nachhaltig, da es mehr als deutlich die gesamten Blattfläche Gewicht.

Singh und Singh (1999) Schätzungen für Streuzersetzung von 28 Monaten für 95%
Masseverlust und 8 Monate für 50% Masseverlust. Christanty et al. (1996) auf der anderen Seite dachte, dass Bambus Wurf relativ langsam aufgrund seiner hohen Silica-Anteil zerlegt. Sie stellten fest, dass ihre Waldboden nach 36 Monaten hauptsächlich aus Bambus-Blätter bestand, Angabe ihrer relativ langsamen Zersetzung. Diskussion Aufgrund der sehr hohen Grad an Variabilität der Daten, ist es sehr schwierig zu verallgemeinern.
Zum Beispiel würde man erwarten, ein breites Beziehung zwischen Produktivität, Temperatur und Niederschlag. Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) Zitat aus mehreren anderen Autoren besagt, dass "Niederschlagsverteilung und begrenzt das Wachstum von Bambus mehr als jeder andere beeinflusst Bestandteil des Klima, mit Ausnahme der Temperatur. "Allerdings ist eine solche Beziehung ist schwierig zu erkennen, in diesen Daten Es scheint, dass man verallgemeinern, jedoch, dass die Menge und Verteilung von Bambus Biomasse aus, dass unterscheidet sich für Baum-Biomasse nach dem Grad nur. Beispielsweise Winjum et al. (1997) Schätzung,
die Speicherung von Kohlenstoff bedeuten, in ober-und unterirdischen Biomasse von Waldbeständen ist 47 t C / ha in den hohen Breiten, 76 t C / ha in mittleren Breiten, 62 t C / ha in low-trockenen Breiten und 80 t C / ha in low-feuchte Breiten. Da Kohlenstoff liegt bei etwa 40% der Biomasse diese Zahlen sind äquivalent zu zwischen 100 und 160 t / ha von Biomasse.

Santa-Regina und Tarazona (2001) Bericht Gesamtbiomasse reichten von 132,7 t / ha in einem Buchenbestand auf 152,1 t / ha im Kiefer stehen in Nordspanien. So ist die Biomasse angegebenen Zahlen in Tabelle 1 dieses Papiers und in Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) sind ziemlich viel innerhalb des erwarteten Bereichs für Woody Biomasse.

Die wichtigsten Unterschiede sind das kleinere Stück Größe und höhere Anzahl von "Stiele" typisch für eine Bambus-Plantage und dass Bambus Biomasse scheint nie zu den sehr hohen Zahlen möglich einen Baum zu nähern steht. Zum Beispiel Alabeck und Juday (1989) Berichtsband Schätzungen für Sitka Spruce im südlichen Alaska, das wäre im Einklang mit trockener Biomasse von über 700 t / ha. Silvester und Orchard (1999) berichten von bis zu t / ha der oberirdischen Biomasse in Kauri (Agathis) in Neuseeland 1700. Ponette et al. (2001) festgestellt, dass gesamte oberirdische Biomasse der Douglasie in Frankreich stieg mit zunehmendem Alter des von etwa 160 t ha-1 in den jüngsten Stände bis 360 t ha-1 in der 54-jährigen Grundstück. Simpson et al. (2000) berichteten, dass für Queensland gesamten Biomasse auf clearfall eines typischen Schrägstrich Kiefer stehen betrug 316 t / ha. Laurance et al. (1999) Studium der Biomasse in den tropischen Regenwald rund Manuas Brasilien gefunden, dass Biomasse schätzt variiert mehr als 2-fach, 231 bis 492 t / ha, mit einem Mittelwert von 356 t / ha.

Dieser Unterschied zwischen Bambus und Baumkulturen bedeutet, dass während durchschnittlich Bambus kann so viel Kohlenstoff wie Baumkulturen auf Websites günstig Bäume, Plantagen f Sequestrierung Bäume abzusondern vieles mehr.

Jährliche Produktivitätssteigerung Zahlen (Tabelle 2) zeigen, dass Bambus kann zwischen 10 und 20 t / ha / Jahr. Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) tabellarisch die Altersklasse Verteilung von Bambus stammt. Sie zeigen, dass für die meisten Arten Halme zwischen vier Jahren des Wachstums verteilt werden. Ihre durchschnittliche Gesamtbiomasse Zahl von 130-142 t /
ha kann daher etwa überarbeitet werden, um eine maximale jährliche Produktivitätssteigerung zwischen 32 und 36 t / ha zeigen - niedriger, wenn die Halme dauern länger. Allerdings Wachstumsraten zwischen 10 und 30 t / ha sind keine Ausnahme unter den Holzbiomasse Arten. Heilman und Xie (1993) berichten mittleren jährlichen holzige Biomasse (oberirdisch), zwischen 21 und 25 t / ha / yr in Pappel in Kanada und in einer späteren Veröffentlichung beschriebenen Schritten von 35 t / ha / yr. Stanley und Montagnini (1999) berichten, dass in jungen Pflanzungen von 4 Baumarten in Costa Rica jährlichen Baum-Biomasse Produktionsraten von etwa 5,2 t / ha auf 10,3 t / ha lag. Anil-Kumar et al. (1998) berichten 17 t / ha / Jahr für Acacia auriculiformis. Srivastava (1995) geschätzt 29 t / ha / Jahr für Casuarina equisitifolia in Uttar Pradesh, Indien, die zeigen, dass die Leistung von Casuarina gut unter trockenen tropischen Bedingungen. Kadeba (1991) berichtet, dass mittleren jährlichen Biomasseproduktion von Pinus caribaea in N. Nigeria 10,75 t / ha über dem 15-Jahres-Zeitraum.

Die Daten für Bambusblatt Biomasse ist variabel (Tabelle 4). Die meisten Stände scheinen Flügelgewichte ~ 5 Tonnen pro Hektar zu haben, obwohl es zwei Beobachtungen bei 10,7 und 14,8 t / ha. Kleinhenz und Midmore (2001) ebenfalls berichten Flügelgewichte zwischen 1 und 11 t / ha mit einem Ausreißer von 37 t / ha. Fünf ihrer 8 Beobachtungen sind 6 t / ha oder weniger. Wenn es in der Regel wahr, dass Bambus Flügelgewichte von ca. 5 t / ha noch hohe Produktivität, die eine mögliche quantitative Unterschied Baumkulturen hinweisen muss. Baumkulturen manchmal höhere Blattbiomasse. ZB Chen et al. (1998) berichten, dass die Biomasse aus einer 9-yr-old Casuarina equisitifolia Stand in Taiwan 119,3 t / ha (7,4, 27,6, 63,5 und 20,8 t / ha für die Blätter, Zweige, Stängel und Wurzeln, jeweils) war. Madgwick (1985) berichteten, dass die Nadel Masse 15 t / ha in Radiata Kiefer zu erreichen steht 4-8 Jahre alt, aber sinkt auf etwa 10 t / ha in älteren Beständen. So Bambus kann mehr Trockenmasse pro Einheit Blattmasse als einige Baumkulturen, aber die Daten sind unzureichend, um dies festzustellen. Bamboo investiert einen beträchtlichen Anteil seiner Energie unterirdische. Jedoch kann die Menge nicht wesentlich größer als für viele Baumkulturen. Oleksyn et al. (1999) ergab, dass insgesamt Wurzelbiomasse entfielen zwischen 19 und 28% der gesamten Stand Biomasse in 12-jährige Kiefer (Pinus sylvestris) aus 19 Populationen in einer Provenienz Experiment in Zentralpolen (52 ° N.) gewachsen. Naidu et al. (1998) fanden, dass dominante Bäume loblolly Kiefer 63,4, 13,2, 11,3 und 12,0% der Biomasse zugeordnet bole, Zweig, Nadel und Wurzelgewebe, verglichen mit 75,9, 6,7, 5,6 und 11,7% für unterdrückte Bäume. Gaston et al.
(1998) berichten, dass im Gras / Strauch Savannen Afrikas die oberirdische Wald-Biomasse
entfielen 75% der gesamten, unterirdische Wald-Biomasse für 21% und Gras / Strauch Savannen 4%. Heilman et al. (1994) arbeitet mit vier-jährige Pappel festgestellt, dass Gesamtgewicht von Baumstümpfen und groben Wurzeln bei der Ernte von 12,3 bis 29,6 t / ha bzw. 22 variiert -
33% des Gewichts der oberirdischen blattlosen Biomasse. So ist die oberirdischen: unterirdische Verteilung von Biomasse in Bambus eventuell nicht ungewöhnlich.

Abschluss
Die Variabilität der aktuell publizierten Daten macht es schwierig, zu verallgemeinern. Mehr
Biomasse einfache Bestimmung benötigt werden. Letztlich ist die Bambus-wachsenden Branche
muss eine einfache Zusammenhang zwischen Produktivität und Verknüpfung Bambus Biomasse Wachstum
Umgebungsvariablen aber zu berechnen derart, werden viel mehr Daten notwendig.
Referenzen
Alaback PB; Juday GP: 1989: Struktur und Zusammensetzung der geringen Höhe Altwachstum
Wälder in der Forschung Naturgebiete Southeast Alaska. Naturgebiete Journal. 1989, 9: 1,
27-39
Anil-Kumar; Siddiqui MH; Pandey ON: 1998: Die Produktion von Biomasse von Acacia
auriculiformis (A. Cunn. ex. Benth.). Journal of Research, Birsa Agricultural University.
1998, 10: 1, 103-106;
Chen TsaiHuei; Sheu BorHung; Chang ChunTe: 1998: Die Akkumulation von Stand Biomasse
und Nährstoffgehalt casuarina Plantagen in der Suhu Küste. Taiwan Journal of Forest Science. 1998, 13: 4, 335-349
Christanty L; Mailly D; Kimmins JP: 1996; Ohne Bambus, stirbt das Land ": Biomasse,
Streu und Humus Dynamik eines javanischen Bambus talun-kebun System.
Forest Ecology and Management. 1996, 87: 1-3, 75-88

Gaston G; Brown S; Lorenzini M; Singh KD: 1998: Staat und Veränderung in Kohlenstoff-Pools in
die Wälder des tropischen Afrika. Global Change Biology. 1998, 4: 1, 97-114
Heilman PE; Xie FG; 1993: Einfluss von Stickstoff auf das Wachstum und die Produktivität der shortrotation Populus trichocarpa X Populus deltoides Hybriden
Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 1993, 23: 9, 1863-1869
Heilman PE; Ekuan G; Fogle D; 1994: Vor-und unterirdischen Biomasse und Feinwurzeln von 4-jährige Hybriden Populus trichocarpa X Populus deltoides und elterliche Arten in Kurzumtriebsplantagen Kultur. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 1994, 24: 6, 1186-1192
Isagi Y; Kawahara T; Kamo K; Ito H: 1997: Net Produktion und Kohlenstoffkreislauf in
Bambus Phyllostachys pubescens stehen. Pflanzenökologie. 1997, 130: 1, 41-52
Kadeba O: 1991: Oberirdische Biomasseproduktion und Nährstoffanreicherung in einem Zeitalter Abfolge von Pinus caribaea steht. Forest Ecology and Management. 1991, 41: 3-4, 237 bis 248.
Kleinhenz V und Midmore DJ: 2001: Aspects of bamboo Agronomie. Advances in
Agronomie 74: 99-149.
Laurance WF; Fearnside Uhr; Laurance SG; Delamonica P; Lovejoy TE; Rankin de
Merona JM; Chambers JQ; Gascon C 1999: Beziehung zwischen Böden und Amazon
Wald-Biomasse: eine Landschaft angelegte Studie. Forest Ecology and Management. 1999, 118: 1-3, 127-138
Lin Yiming; Lin Peng; Wen Wanzhang: Untersuchungen zur Dynamik von Kohlenstoff und Stickstoff
Elemente in Dendrocalamopsis oldhami Wald. Jounal of Bamboo Research. 1998, 17.04, 25-30. In der chinesischen Sprache.
Lin Yiming; Li Huicong; Linpeng; Xiao Xiantan; Ma Zhanxing: Biomasse Struktur und
Energy Distribution von Dend roca Lamus latiforus Munro. Bevölkerung. Jounal of Bamboo
Research. 2000, 19.04, 36-41. In der chinesischen Sprache.
Madgwick HAI: 1985: Trockenmasse-und Nährstoff Beziehungen in Ständen der Pinus radiata.
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science. 1985, 15: 3, 324-336
Naidu SL; DeLucia EH; Thomas RB 1998: Kontrastreiche Muster von Biomasse Zuteilung dominant und unterdrückt loblolly Kiefer. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 1998, 28: 8, 1116-1124
Oleksyn J; Reich PB; Chalupka W; Tjoelker MG 1999: Differential ober-und unterirdischen Biomasse Ansammlung von europäischen Pinus sylvestris Populationen in einem 12-jährigen Provenienz Experiment. Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research. 1999, 14: 1, 7-17
Ponette Q; Ranger J; Ottorini JM; Ulrich E. 2001: Oberirdische Biomasse und Nährstoffen
Inhalt der fünf Douglasie steht in Frankreich. Forest Ecology and Management. 2001,
142: 1 3, 109 127
Santa Regina I; Tarazona T: 2001: Nährstoffkreislauf in einem natürlichen Buchenwälder und angrenzenden gepflanzt Kiefern im Norden Spaniens. Forstwirtschaft Oxford. 2001, 74: 1, 11-28
Shanmughavel P; Francis K 1996: Biomasse und Nährstoffkreislauf in Bambus (Bambusa
bambos) Plantagen in tropischen Gegenden. Biologie und Fruchtbarkeit der Böden. 1996, 23: 4, 431-434
Silvester-WB; Orchard-TA 1999: Die Biologie des Kauri (Agathis australis) in New
Zealand. I. Produktion, Biomasse, Speicherung von Kohlenstoff, und Wurf fallen in vier Waldresten.
New-Zealand-Journal-of-Botanik. 1999, 37: 3, 553-571
Simpson JA; Xu ZH; Smith T; Keay P; Osborne DO; Podberscek M; Nambiar EKS (ed.); Tiarks A (Hrsg.); Cossalter C (Hrsg.); Ranger J: 2000: Auswirkungen der Bauleitung in Kiefer Plantagen auf den Küstenebenen von subtropischen Queensland, Australien. Standort
Management und Produktivität im tropischen Plantagenwäldern: ein Fortschrittsbericht. Workshop Proceedings, Kerala, Indien, 7-11 Dezember 1999. 2000, 73-81
Singh AN; Singh JS: 1999: Biomasse, Netto-Primärproduktion und die Auswirkungen von Bambus
Plantage auf den Boden Sanierung in einem trockenen tropischen Region. Waldökologie und Management. 1999, 119: 1-3, 195-207
Srivastava AK; 1995: Biomasse und Energieerzeugung in Casuarina equisetifolia
Plantage steht im abgebaut trockenen Tropen der Vindhyan Plateau Indien. Biomasse und Bioenergie. 1995, 9: 6, 465-471
Stanley WG; Montagnini F: 1999: Biomasse und Nährstoffanreicherung in reinen und gemischten Pflanzungen einheimischer Baumarten auf armen Böden in den feuchten Tropen von Costa Rica gewachsen. : Forest Ecology and Management. 1999, 113: 1, 91-103
Tripathi, S.K. und Singh, KP, 1993: Eine ökologische Bewertung der räumlichen Muster in Standortbedingungen in Bambus-Plantagen in einem trockenen tropischen Region mit einem Kommentar zu verklumpen bzw. Abstand. Indian Forester. 1993, 119: 3, 238-246
Tripathi, S.K. und Singh, KP, 1994: Produktivität und Nährstoffkreislauf in kurzem
geerntet und reifen Bambus Savannen in den trockenen Tropen. Journal of Applied Ecology.
1994, 31: 1, 109-124
Veblen, T.T., Schlegel, F.M. und Escobar, BR, 1980: Trockensubstanz Produktion von zwei
Arten von Bambus (Chusquea culeou und C. tenuiflora) in Süd-Zentral-Chile. Journal of Ecology 68: 397-404
Verwijst T; Telenius B; Makeschin F: 1999: Biomasse Schätzverfahren kurz
Rotation Forstwirtschaft. Special issue: Kurzumtrieb in Mittel-und Nordeuropa.
Forest Ecology and Management. 1999, 121: 1-2, 137-146
Winjum JK; Dixon RC; Schroeder PE 1997: Kohlenstoffspeicherung im Wald Plantagen und
ihre Holzprodukte. Journal of World Forest Resource Management. 1997, 8: 1, 1-19
Zhou Shiqiang; Huang Jinyan, eine Studie über die klonale Population Biomasse von jungen
Bashania fangiana nach natürlichen Regeneration. Jounal of Bamboo Research. 1997, 16: 2,
35-39. In der chinesischen Sprache.



Druckversion der Seite:http://bambus--galerie.de/bamboo-biomass.html

Das Bambus-Lexikon wurde 2005 als frei zugängliche Datenbank nach meiner Idee erstellt und erarbeitet. Das Bambus-Lexikon wird von mir laufend aktualisiert. Mit diesen Webseiten und den Bambusinformationen möchte ich meine mehr als 35 jährigen Bambuserfahrungen, mein Wissen und alle von mir gesammelten Daten und eigene Erfahrungen aus dem In- und Ausland an die vielen Pflanzenfreunde weitergeben, um den Bambus in unseren Breiten noch populärer zu machen und seine vielseitige Verwendbarkeit einer breiten Öffentlichkeit vermitteln. Mein Lexikon erhebt nicht den Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit und ist kein Wissenschaftliches Werk.
Die Inhalte der Seiten wurden mit größter Sorgfalt erstellt. Für die Richtigkeit, Vollständigkeit und Aktualität der Inhalte und Hinweise kann ich jedoch keine Gewähr übernehmen. Nach §§ 8 bis 10 TMG bin ich als Anbieter der Seiten jedoch nicht verpflichtet, übermittelte oder gespeicherte fremde Informationen zu überwachen oder nach Umständen zu forschen, die auf eine rechtswidrige Tätigkeit hinweisen.
Die angegebenen Werte (Höhe, Winterhärte etc.) sind Durchschnittswerte, die je nach Standort erheblich voneinander abweichen können und gelten nicht für Bambus im Kübel. So wird ein Phyllostachys vivax 'Aureocaulis' im norddeutschen Küstenbereich und Dänemark selten über 5 Meter hoch, während diese Sorte z. B. in Süd-West-Deutschland bereits nach ein paar Jahren diese Höhe erreicht. In den wärmeren Regionen unseres Landes schon nach ca. 7 Jahren mehr als 8 Meter hoch sein kann.
Über Mitarbeit, Anregungen, Ergänzungen, Erfahrungswerte, Pflanzendaten und Bilder, aber auch über Kritik, bin ich jederzeit dankbar. Sollten Sie mir Bilder per Email senden,  so geben Sie damit gleichzeitig Ihr Einverständnis für eine Veröffentlichung auf diesen Seiten. Bitte per Email senden an : FV@Bambus-Lexikon.de
Mein Dank geht an 1. Stelle an meine liebe Frau, ohne deren Geduld, Liebe und Verständnis es für mich nicht möglich gewesen wäre, die riesige Datenmenge in das Web zu stellen. / Last but for sure the more imporant, I would like to thank my wife. She is my love, my best friend and so much more... Without her understanding, patience , love , it wouldn't have been possible for me to put together  this huge amount of data in the web. THANK YOU Angel. / Mes remerciements s’adressent en premier lieu à ma chère femme, sans sa patience, son amour et sa compréhension, il n’aurait pas été possible pour moi de mettre en ligne cette immense quantité de données.
Ich habe bis 2009 in meiner Freizeit mehr als 8500 Stunden am PC verbracht und besonders in den Wintermonaten, Abend für Abend (häufig bis zum frühen Morgen) und fast das ganze Wochenende, oft auch ungeduldig und schimpfend (wenn der Computer mal wieder seine Macken hatte) am PC verbracht!

Für die Überlassung vieler guter Fotos geht mein besonderer Dank an Daniel Kunz aus der Schweiz. Für die Bereitstellung einiger Fotos bedanke ich mich bei den Bambusfreunden im In- und Ausland. Das Bambus-Lexikon ist ein privates, frei zugängliches Lexikon.

Sollten Sie mir ein Nachricht mit Bildern zusenden, so geben Sie mit damit Ihr Einverständnis zur anonymen Veröffentlichung im Bambus-Lexikon.

Copyright: Sämtliche Inhalte, Design, inklusive aller Bilder und Bildershows sind urheberechtlich geschützt. Das Urheberrecht liegt bei mir.
Eine Verwendung von Texten, Bildern und anderen Informationen ist grundsätzlich untersagt. Für eine Weiterverwendung benötigen Sie meine Zustimmung.

© All text and photos are protected by copyright. No unauthorized copy and use permitted in other media. fv@bambus-lexikon.de

Fred Vaupel im Frühjahr 2005

 


 
 

Bambustage in Lehrte-Steinwedel


vom 2. - 9. April 2009


Feiern Sie mit uns in den Frühling.

MO-FR 10-18.30 Uhr
SA 10-16 Uhr
SO 5. April: Schautag von 11-16 Uhr

• Bambuspflanzen in großer Vielfalt •
• Neue Buddhafiguren aus verschiedenen Materialien •
• Tolle Accessoires und Ideen aus Bambus und Granit •

ausblenden